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Material of the Month: May 2017 – Oak

Why it inspired us…

Many people know May for Mayday at the beginning of the month, but much like May day, we have Shick-Shack Day at the end of May. Also known as Royal Oak Day, it refers to the restoration of King Charles II to the throne in 1660, ending the puritan commonwealth that had been introduced in 1649. Charles II hid in an oak tree to hide from the Roundheads near Boscobel where he remained in solemn silence for a whole day to avoid being captured. On May 29th people would cover the statue of Charles II, which stands in the courtyard at the Royal Hospital in Chelsea with oak broughs and wear oak sprigs on their lapels.

Why we would like it to inspire you…

Oak is a hard and decorative wood with a particularly attractive figure in quarter-sawn material. It is a remarkable material; strong, durable, heavy and attractive, which makes it the ideal wood to use in construction both indoors and outdoors.

Oak is suitable for construction beams, restoration work, post and rail fencing, bridge building, lintels, board-walks, flooring, outdoor and indoor furniture. Oak is durable outdoors and does not need preservative treatment. It has once again become popular for outdoor fencing, gates, furniture and features especially in urban areas – both because there is no painting and low maintenance requirements. Also traditionally used as the main ship building timber. Tannins in the wood make the heartwood exceptionally durable out of doors and without treatment.


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