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Case Study 14 – Roucan Loch Crematorium

Name of building
Roucan Loch Crematorium
Date Completed
2005
Building type
Public
Location
Roucan Loch, Dumfries
Client
Roucan Loch
Main contractor

Ashleigh (Scotland) Ltd

Anticipated lifespan of building
60 years
Awards

Glasgow Institute of Architects, Design Commendation 2005

Wood

Timber technologies

The building transforms a noisy, industrial, high-fire-risk area into a sensitive, quiet and memorable building, making it special for the people using it. Use of timber plays a large part in achieving this goal, in particular the timber clad crematorium service room.

The building has a glulam timber structure, and uses western red cedar externally and yellow pine internally.

Special timber-related features

The landscaped setting emphasises the peaceful atmosphere of the space, and was key to the design of the building. Glazing on both sides of the service room frames the views to the woodland and the loch. The building is positioned as close to the loch as possible to allow natural light to reflect into the service room from the surface of the water.

Background to building

Roucan Loch Crematorium is the only crematorium in Dumfries & Galloway. It serves the local community who would otherwise have to make a round trip of 120 miles to the nearest crematorium. It is set in ten acres of natural countryside, bordered to the north by mature Scots pine woodland, and to the south by Roucan Loch itself.

The building consists mainly of a service room which holds up to 40 people. It is designed to host small-scale services (held in addition to a main service in the Church or Chapel of Rest), or for private committals for immediate family and close friends who wish to grieve in the serene and peaceful atmosphere of Roucan Loch.

Mass Timber Systems – route to market

Mass Timber: The popularity of mass timber systems is on the rise. Timber products, due to their environmental credentials and other benefits, are becoming the

Occupant Comfort and Wellbeing in Housing

On July 25th Architecture & Design Scotland in collaboration with Mackintosh Environmental Architecture Research Unit (MEARU) from Glasgow School of Art hosted a CPD event

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